Punk killed progressive rock: the big lie

Punk killed progressive rock: the big lie

It often happens that a certain idea that is widespread, after investigating a little, one finds that it doesn’t have a foundation backing it up. I quote two examples. We’re used to see a representation of a Viking wearing a helmet with two horns: the helmets were never like that, that image came out from a painter that wanted Vikings to look more terrorizing. At school they would talk to us about Napoleon Bonaparte and his low height, but in reality he measured five feet with 6.5 inches (1.69 meters), which was superior to the average height of men in France and England in that era. When Napoleon died, he was measured, and the data collected was 5 feet with two inches (1.57 meters). But that measurement was made with French feet and inches which were slightly bigger than the English units: when that number was interpreted as English feet and inches the emperor of France appeared to be shorter than he really was and from that moment on that lie disseminated everywhere.

If I present this as an introduction is because I believe there is an idea about progressive rock that is a fallacy. In reality, I believe there are many lies that have been told about progressive rock but I’ll analyze just one: the affirmation that punk rock finished progressive rock. Morat (2000, p.39) it shows us with a typical example of this idea: “Way back when dinosaurs (Emerson, Lake and Palmer, Genesis et al.) ruled the earth, it was the Pistols who drove them to extinction”. And in a BBC documentary, a so-called expert affirms, “Almost overnight, after The Sex Pistols, prog rock came to a halt”. We find variations of these statements every moment in rock books and documentaries –including those that do not disdain progressive rock.

Let’s say that we accept the above-mentioned statement. If punk finished progressive rock, in what aspects, would that be noticed? The following occurs to me:

  1. With the punk boom, the sales of prog rock would drastically drop or, plainly the groups of this genre would stop recording albums.
  2. The concerts of prog rock groups would be almost empty because their fans would want to hear punk bands.
  3. Punk gets to be so dominant that prog rockers decide to abandon their style to dedicate themselves to play punk.

Let’s review the first point: How many albums do the prog rock groups sold from 1976 forward? I’m using 1976 as a starting point because rock critics mark that moment as the beginning of the referenced influence of punk in the supposed decline of progressive rock. Let’s remember also that’s the year that the Sex Pistols put out their first single and, in the month of December, occurs their polemic apparition on television that brought great media attention. Let’s see these data from Wikipedia.

Group Album Date Sales
Jethro Tull Songs from the Wood February 1977 Gold record (U.S.A., Canada)
Heavy Horses

 

April 1978 Gold record (U.S.A.), Silver record (U.K.)
Live – Bursting Out September 1978 Gold Record (U.S.A., Canada), Silver Record (U.K.)
Stormwatch

 

September 1979 Gold Record (U.S.A., Canada)
Genesis

 

 

A Trick of the Tail

 

February 1976 Gold Record (U.S.A., U.K., France)
Wind & Wuthering

 

December 1976 Gold Record (U.S.A., U.K., France)
…And Then There Were Three…

 

March 1978 Gold Record (Germany, U.K., France). Platinum Record (U.S.A.)

You can consult the discographies of Yes, Pink Floyd and Emerson, Lake and Palmer and it will show something similar happening: they get gold, platinum and silver albums. Even “Love Beach” by ELP, which is considered by many a failed album, was a gold record in the United States.

Let’s go to point two: what happened to the concerts of prog rock groups since 1976? The Emerson, Lake and Palmer north American tour of 1977 is as big as the previous ones and includes four dates at Madison Square Garden and two at Montreal’s Olympic Stadium (Forrester, Hanson & Askew, 2001). Also in those years, the number of concerts and the size of venues where Yes and Pink Floyd performed are equally impressive. In such a way that no relation can be established between the emergence of punk and the sales of records and tickets by progressive rock groups because they continued to be as well as before. I will say it again: progressive rock still had a big commercial impact so there is no way of establishing any influence over it by punk rock. As affirmed by Sean Albiez (2003, p. 360) “In fact, punk could not commercially compete with Pink Floyd, Genesis or Yes, pop/rock artists ELO, Abba and David Soul, and disco in the late 1970s and early 1980s”.

Point number three: of course not a single prog rock group changed their style to play punk. Although the simplification of progressive rock is notorious in various elements of its music, one would have to demonstrate that this was due to punk. According to Edward Macan (1997, p. 186-87) this simplification derived from two progressive rock by-products: the “Stadium rock”— Kansas, Boston, Styx, Rush, Toto, Journey, R.E.O. Speedwagon, Foreigner, Heart, etc. — and the “Symphonic British Pop”— Electric Light Orchestra, Supertramp, 10 cc, the Alan Parsons Project, among others. In summary, punk rock didn’t get to have a great influence in those years as many love to say. Dave Laing in “One Chord Wonders” (2015, p.46-7) affirms, “Before the end of 1977 it was clear to the record industry that punk would not become any kind of Big Thing. There had not been ‘the predicted domination by the punks and their associates’ wrote one relieved commentator ” and later he says that “Punk rock, then, had failed to emulate the kind of commercial success of that earlier Next Big Thing, and consequently its stylistic impact on the musical mainstream was a limited one”.

Once stated that there is no foundation whatsoever in saying that punk finished prog rock, the question that follows is: where and why does this lie came to be? Tommy Udo (2017) tells us that “It was in the pages of NME, Melody Maker and Sounds that we were told that prog was the class enemy and encouraged to feel hatred”. The author Sean Albiez agrees:

The polarisation of ‘prog’ and punk promulgated in the 1976–1977 period may have as much to do with internal class and gender politics in the Melody Maker offices (Caroline Coon versus . . . the rest?) as a real groundswell of anti-progressive sentiment (Johnstone 1995, pp. 217–18). The Coon analysis of the burgeoning punk scene as a knowing, working-class kick in the face of middle-class, University-educated progressives (a narrative Lydon employs, but implicitly contradicts) seems a defining trope which froze debate on the musical explosion of punk; (…) Coon’s iconoclastic narrative predetermined the future discourses of punk history, and is frequently reproduced in popular television histories of rock and punk. (Albiez, 2003, p.359)

As we see, we have an invented and widespread idea by the rock press in a pursuit to diminish a kind of music that wasn’t up to their taste. This history forgerers continue to repeat their lies, on brazenly, lies that others, possibly without bad faith but with the terrible habit of repeating without verifying, reproducing it time and time again.

On my part, there is nothing more to conclude, based on the evidence that I have shown, that punk didn’t even tickled progressive rock.

 

References

Albiez, S. (2003). Know history!: John Lydon, cultural capital and the prog/punk dialectic. Popular Music, 22(3), 357-374.

Forrester, G., Hanson, M., & Askew, F. (2001). Emerson, Lake and Palmer: the show that never ends. London: Helter Skelter.

Genesis discography. (2017, June 02). Retrieved June 20, 2017, from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Genesis_discography

Jethro Tull discography. (2017, June 01). Retrieved June 20, 2017, from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jethro_Tull_discography

Laing, D. (2015). One chord wonders: power and meaning in punk rock. Oakland: Pm Press.

Morat. (2000). 1. The greatest punk album ever: Never Mind the Bollocks’. Noise Pollution: the Punk Magazine, 39-39.

Tommy Udo, T. (2017, June 07). Did Punk Kill Prog? Retrieved June 20, 2017, from http://teamrock.com/feature/2017-06-07/did-punk-kill-prog

 

El punk mató al rock progresivo: la gran mentira

El punk mató al rock progresivo: la gran mentira

Ocurre a menudo que cierta idea ampliamente difundida, después de investigarla un poco se encuentra que no tiene ningún fundamento que la respalde. Cito algunos ejemplos. Estamos acostumbrados a ver una representación de un vikingo portando un casco con dos cuernos; pues los cascos nunca fueron así, esa imagen surgió de un pintor que quería hacer que los vikingos se vieran más atemorizantes. En la escuela primaria nos hacían aprendernos la biografía de Francisco I. Madero pero… ¿sabíamos que significaba la letra “I” en su nombre? ¿Israel?, ¿Ifigenio?, ¿Inocencio? ¡Ah, Indalecio!, ¿verdad?, eso es lo que nos dijeron en la escuela. Pues ocurre que se encontró su acta y su fe de bautismo y se vio que su segundo nombre era Ignacio. También nos cuentan que el niño héroe Juan Escutia se envolvió en la bandera nacional y se aventó desde no sé dónde del castillo de Chapultepec; pero ¿alguien lo vió realmente?, ¿qué testigos tenemos de ello?, ¿será una historia creída por todos pero sin una base real?

Si presento esto como introducción es porque creo que hay una idea sobre el rock progresivo que es una falacia. En realidad, creo que hay muchísimas mentiras que se han dicho sobre el progresivo pero analizaré sólo una: la afirmación de que el rock punk acabó con el rock progresivo.

Morat (2000, p.39) nos presenta un ejemplo típico de esta idea: “Hace mucho tiempo, cuando los dinosaurios (Emerson, Lake and Palmer, Genesis et al.) gobernaban la Tierra, los Pistols fueron quienes los llevaron a la extinción.” Y en un documental de la BBC, un supuesto experto afirma “Casi de la noche a la mañana, después de los Sex Pistols, el rock progresivo se detuvo abruptamente”. Variaciones de estos enunciados los encontramos a cada momento en libros y documentales de rock —incluso en aquellos que no menosprecian al progresivo.

Digamos que aceptamos dicha declaración. Si el punk acabó con el progresivo, ¿en qué aspectos se notaría esto? Se me ocurre lo siguiente:

  1. Al surgir el punk las ventas de los álbumes de rock progresivo caerían drásticamente o, de plano, estos grupos dejarían de grabar álbumes.
  2. Los conciertos de los grupos progresivos estarían semivacíos porque se fueron a escuchar a bandas de punk.
  3. El punk llega a ser tan dominante que los roqueros progresivos abandonan su estilo para dedicarse a tocar punk.

Revisemos el primer punto: ¿cuántos álbumes vendieron los grupos de progresivo del año 1976 en adelante? Uso como punto de partida el año de 1976 porque es cuando los Sex Pistols lanzan su primer sencillo y por su polémica aparición en televisión, en diciembre del mismo año, que se tradujo en una gran atención de los medios. Veamos estos datos —tomados de la Wikipedia en Inglés.

Grupo Album Fecha Ventas
Jethro Tull Songs from the Wood Febrero 1977 Disco de Oro (U.S.A., Canadá)
Heavy Horses

 

Abril 1978 Disco de Oro (U.S.A.), Disco de Plata (U.K.)
Live – Bursting Out Septiembre 1978 Disco de Oro (U.S.A., Canadá), Disco de Plata (U.K.)
Stormwatch

 

Septiembre 1979 Disco de Oro (U.S.A., Canadá)
Genesis A Trick of the Tail

 

Febrero 1976 Disco de Oro (U.S.A., U.K., Francia)
Wind & Wuthering

 

Diciembre 1976 Disco de Oro (U.S.A., U.K., Francia)
…And Then There Were Three…

 

Marzo 1978 Disco de Oro (Alemania, U.K., Francia). Disco de Platino (U.S.A.)

Se pueden consultar las discografías de Yes, Pink Floyd y Emerson, Lake and Palmer y se verá que ocurre algo similar: obtienen discos de oro, de platino y de plata. Incluso “Love Beach” de ELP, que es considerado por muchos como un álbum fallido, fue disco de oro en Estados Unidos.

Vayamos al punto dos: ¿qué ocurrió con los conciertos de los grupos progresivos a partir de 1976?

La gira norteamericana de Emerson, Lake and Palmer de 1977 es tan grande como las anteriores e incluye cuatro fechas en el Madison Square Garden y dos en el estadio Olímpico de Montreal. (Forrester, Hanson & Askew, 2001) También en esos años, el número de conciertos y el tamaño de los foros en que se presentan Yes y Pink Floyd son igualmente impresionantes.

De tal forma que, no se puede establecer ninguna relación entre el surgimiento del punk y las ventas de discos y boletos de los grupos progresivos porque estas continuaron igual de bien que antes. Lo volveré a decir: el rock progresivo seguía teniendo un gran impacto comercial así que no hay manera de establecer ninguna influencia sobre este del rock punk.

Como afirma Sean Albiez (2003, p. 360) “De hecho, el punk no podía competir comercialmente, a finales de los 70 y principios de los 80, con Pink Floyd, Genesis o Yes, artistas de pop/rock como ELO, Abba y David Soul, o con la música disco.”

Punto número tres: por supuesto que ningún grupo progresivo cambió su estilo para tocar punk. Aunque es notoria una simplificación del rock progresivo en varios elementos de su música, habría que demostrarse si esto se debió al punk. Para Edward Macan (1997, p. 186-87) esta simplificación se debió a dos derivados del rock progresivo, el “Stadium rock”— Kansas, Boston, Styx, Rush, Toto, Journey, R.E.O. Speedwagon, Foreigner, Heart, etc. — y el “Pop Sinfónico Británico” — Electric Light Orchestra, Supertramp, 10 cc, the Alan Parsons Project, entre otros.

En resumen, el punk no llegó a tener gran influencia en esos años como a muchos les encanta decir. Dave Laing en “One Chord Wonders” (2015, p.46-7) afirma que “Hacia finales de 1977 estaba claro para la industria discográfica que el punk no se convertiría en ningún ‘Próximo Gran Suceso’ de la música. No había alcanzado ‘la prevista dominación por los punks y sus asociados’ descrita por un complacido comentarista”; y más adelante nos dice que “El rock punk, por tanto, no había conseguido emular el tipo de éxito comercial del anterior Next Big Thing, y por lo tanto su impacto estilístico en el mainstream musical fue limitado.”

Una vez visto que no hay fundamento alguno para decir que el punk acabó con el progresivo, la pregunta que sigue es ¿de dónde y por qué surgió esta mentira?

Tommy Udo (2017) nos cuenta que “Fue en las páginas de NME, Melody Maker y Sounds que nos dijeron que el progresivo era el enemigo de clase y se nos alentó a sentir odio.” El autor Sean Albiez concuerda:

La polarización entre el progresivo y el punk difundida en el período 1976-1977 puede tener tanto que ver con las políticas internas de clase y de género en las oficinas de Melody Maker (Caroline Coon contra … ¿todos los demás?) como con una verdadera oleada de sentimiento anti-progresivo. (Johnstone 1995, pp. 217-18). El análisis de Coon de la emergente escena punk como una deliberada patada de la clase obrera en la cara de los progresivos, universitarios de clase media, (una narración que Lydon emplea, pero que contradice implícitamente) parece un tropo definitorio que frenó el debate (…) La narrativa iconoclasta de Coon predeterminó los discursos futuros de la historia del punk, y se reproduce a menudo en populares historias televisivas del rock y del punk. (Albiez, 2003, p.359)

Como se ve, tenemos una idea inventada y difundida por la prensa de rock. Estos falsificadores de la historia continúan desde entonces repitiendo su mentira con absoluto descaro, mentira que otros, posiblemente sin mala fe pero con esa pésima costumbre de repetir sin verificar, reproducen una y otra vez.

Por mi parte, no me queda otra más que concluir, con base en la evidencia que te he presentado, que el punk ni cosquillas le hizo al rock progresivo.

Referencias

Albiez, S. (2003). Know history!: John Lydon, cultural capital and the prog/punk dialectic. Popular Music, 22(3), 357-374.

Forrester, G., Hanson, M., & Askew, F. (2001). Emerson, Lake and Palmer: the show that never ends. London: Helter Skelter.

Genesis discography. (2017, June 02). Retrieved June 20, 2017, from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Genesis_discography

Jethro Tull discography. (2017, June 01). Retrieved June 20, 2017, from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jethro_Tull_discography

Laing, D. (2015). One chord wonders: power and meaning in punk rock. Oakland: Pm Press.

Morat. (2000). 1. The greatest punk album ever: Never Mind the Bollocks’. Noise Pollution: the Punk Magazine, 39-39.

Tommy Udo, T. (2017, June 07). Did Punk Kill Prog? Retrieved June 20, 2017, from http://teamrock.com/feature/2017-06-07/did-punk-kill-prog